How to apply

REGISTER YOUR INTEREST

Applicants for STJU Melbourne Joint PhD projects should:

  • Identify a project of interest
  • Register their interest with the project supervisor based at the University of Melbourne, including the following information:
    • Name, contact details
    • Joint PhD project of interest
    • Cover Letter, CV and Transcript
    • Any supporting documentation

Note:

  • All applicants are required to meet the entry requirements for a PhD at both partner universities to be considered for the program.
  • All applicants are required to meet the English language requirements of SJTU.
  • According to SJTU policy, all Chinese nationals are required to have SJTU as their home institution.
  • SJTU home candidates will be required to complete 12 months of coursework at SJTU.
  • All participants are required to complete 12 months’ residency at the partner institution.

CHECK ADMISSION CRITERIA

Minimum entry requirements for a PhD at Melbourne are summarised on the course website of the relevant faculty of your University of Melbourne supervisor:

Important:

 

FINANCIAL SUPPORT

The successful candidates will be funded by either UoM or STJU. This funding includes a full scholarship, health insurance and mobility support.

  • All participants will receive a UoM Graduate Research Scholarship/SJTU scholarship when located at Melbourne/Shanghai.  Please note that the SJTU scholarship for non-Chinese nationals includes a monthly stipend of 5000RMB, a monthly accommodation allowance of 1500RMB and the annual insurance of 800RMB as required by the Chinese government. Further information on accommodation and living expenses is available here.
  • Scholarship support will be available for up to 4 years.

Long-term behaviour of offshore pile foundations under cyclic loading

This joint PhD project is based at the Shanghai Jiao Tong University with a 12 month stay at The University of Melbourne.

Project description:
Offshore wind power becomes one of today’s fastest growing renewable energy sources and the frontier of marine developments in China. Currently, the capacity   of offshore wind turbines has reached 6.8 GW, and 75% of the available wind turbines use pile foundations. As most pile foundation located in soft clay seabeds in China, one critical issue of the foundation is the accumulated deformation under long-term cyclic loads. This project will conduct systematic experimental and numerical studies to investigate the pile behaviour under long-term cyclic loading, where a new design framework will be proposed through the close collaboration between SJTU and UoM.

This project aims to advance the understanding of pile-soil interaction and propose a new design approach for pile foundation. The scopes of work in this project include:

  1. to investigate the pile-soil interaction in clay through advanced numerical finite element modelling and rigorous geotechnical centrifuge modelling. The effect of soil compaction and coupled soil-pore water will be examined in the soil domain around piles;
  2. to explore the influence of the number of cycles on soil weakening through laboratory testing, which will be used to calibrate our advanced soil constitutive model (based on the bounding surface framework). The ratcheting effect of stress-strain relationship of clayey soils will be investigated by relating to the stress-induced anisotropy. From the cyclic triaxial tests, soil over consolidation and structure will be scrutinised to calibrate and advance existing advanced soil model;
  3. to propose a new design tool that can be readily employed by offshore engineers to calculate the long-term deformation of pile foundations.

The research works, including laboratory cyclic triaxial tests, development of constitutive model, extensive numerical simulations and centrifugal model tests, will be conducted by the collaborative teams.  Special attention will be focused on the pile-soil interaction in marine clay and stress-strain response of soil around pile under long- term cyclic loading. These scientific problems will be solved through a close collaboration between SJTU and UoM. Two teams’ activities mainly include the following four aspects:

  1. SJTU: A large number of cyclic triaxial tests will be carried out to study the strain accumulation and stiffness attenuation characteristics of marine clay under long-term cyclic loading;
  2. SJTU: Based on the cyclic triaxial test results, our elastoplastic constitutive model will be improved to allow an accurate description of the strain accumulation subject to a large number of cyclic loading;
  3. UoM: Based on the improved constitutive model, the law of soil weakening and plastic deformation around the pile under long-term cyclic load will be explored and further implemented into finite element package;
  4. SJTU: Batches of centrifuge tests will be carried out to observe the cumulative plastic deformation of the soil around the pile and the pile-soil interaction during the loading process.

The team members at SJTU and UoM have extensive expertise in offshore geotechnical engineering and have been well known with world-class testing facilities and numerical modelling capability.

Out of the 4 research activities listed above, the laboratory testing, constitutive model development and geotechnical centrifuge modelling will be conducted at SJTU. The numerical analysis will be carried out by the SJTU PhD student co-supervised by CI Tian and the team during the one year visiting to implement the advanced elatoplastic soil model into finite element package ABAQUS.

The research outcomes from this project will fundamentally benefit the offshore industry by providing more reliable knowledge-based design method for pile foundation to underpin offshore wind development, to enable the competence of offshore renewable sector over traditional energies.

The project will be complemented by the project Developing a novel foundation to secure floating renewable energy turbines and the collaboration will ensure a successful completion of the project.

Supervision team:

Professor Guanlin Ye (Shanghai Jiao Tong University)
Associate Professor Yinghui Tian (The University of Melbourne)

 


Developing a novel foundation to secure floating renewable energy turbines

This joint PhD project is based at The University of Melbourne with a 12 month stay at the Shanghai Jiao Tong University.

Project description:
Australian marine renewable energy sector remains underdeveloped, impeded by the high costs to install wind and wave turbines. Over 40% of the expenditure lies in the foundation solutions to secure the turbines. Developing more economic as well as efficient foundations in our marine environmental conditions is the key scientific challenge to tap the immense renewable energies, especially in deep waters. This project aims to develop such a geotechnical solution by methodically examining a novel foundation system to secure the game-changing floating turbines, through the close collaboration between the teams at UoM and SJTU.

Whilst the partner team in Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU) is mainly focusing on advancing the understanding of the behaviour of monopile foundations subjected to cyclic loading, the University of Melbourne (UoM) team will develop a novel foundation to secure the next generation of floating wind and wave turbines. The idea of this novel foundation system is based on the concept of ‘hybrid foundation’ with a helical pile connected to an external caisson, combining the individual advantage, i.e. great resisting capacity and stiffness to horizontal and moment loads from the caisson and significant transient vertical uplift resistance from the helical pile.

Expected to remarkably reduce costs and provide a viable geotechnical solution for floating turbines, this foundation system will be fully developed in this project, through rigorous numerical finite element modelling and advanced centrifuge testing. This novel foundation, with a great potential to be commercialised, is expected to contribute   to secure the game-changing floating turbines, which will be required in our deep-water regions as the traditional fixed turbines can only be used in <50m water depth.

The specific scopes of the research in this project are:

  1. to fully develop the novel foundation concept through fundamental theoretical derivation, advanced numerical finite element modelling and rigorous geotechnical centrifuge modelling;
  2. to observe the performance of the novel foundation system from the centrifuge modelling by spinning the soil sample at 100 times the earth gravity to maintain stress similitude as in-situ condition;
  3. to optimise the foundation system by conducting systematic numerical finite element analyses to simulate the foundation response under long term environmental loading;
  4. to compile the research outcomes and develop a new calculation tool that can be readily employed by offshore engineers to predict the response of the novel foundation system.

This project will be achieved based on the close collaborative consortium between UoM and SJTU, which will be further strengthened through this project.  The analytical studies, centrifuge tests, numerical modelling in the scopes of this project are designed to take full advantage of both sides’ excellent expertise, research environment and the available technical and financial support.  Out of the 4 research scopes listed above, the novel foundation concept development, optimisation from numerical modelling and new calculation tool development will be conducted based in UoM. The centrifuge tests will be carried out by using the world-class centrifuge at SJTU by the UoM PhD student co-supervised by the team at SJTU. The PhD student will also work closely with CI Ye during the one year period of visiting to implement the advanced soil model into finite element package ABAQUS.

The project will be complemented by the project on Long-term behaviour of offshore pile foundations under cyclic loading and the collaboration will ensure a successful completion of the project.

Supervision team:

Associate Professor Yinghui Tian (The University of Melbourne)
Professor Guanlin Ye (Shanghai Jiao Tong University)

 


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FOR UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE HOME BASED GRADUATE RESEARCHERS AT SJTU

What are the benefits of the SJTU scholarships?
The SJTU scholarship for non-Chinese nationals includes a monthly stipend of 5000RMB, a monthly accommodation allowance of 1500RMB and the annual insurance of 800RMB as required by the Chinese government.

What types of accommodation options are available?
The SJTU website provides a wealth of information to assist you with your decision making.  The monthly living allowance can be used for subsidized on campus accommodation –  please be aware that there is limited availability and that it is a competitive process.  UoM home based students are encouraged to plan ahead and apply early as the application process opens just before the September semester starts.

Private accommodation is available and it is the graduate researcher’s responsibility to organize private accommodation – which is generally more expensive than the on campus accommodation.

Which campus should I apply for on campus accommodation?
You can apply for both campuses and there are shuttle buses between campuses. Each campus has an adjacent train station and tickets are 4 RMB.

In terms of my living allowance, how should I budget for food?
The SJTU are fantastic and offer subsidized meals for ~15 RMB. Off campus dining is also affordable at ~25 RMB per meal.


Novel photodetectors based on nanomaterials: devices and applications

This joint PhD project will be based at The University of Melbourne with a 12 month stay at the Shanghai Jiao Tong University.

Project description:
Recent advances in nanomaterials present opportunities for novel photodetector devices and for imaging and spectroscopy systems based on them.  Much of the previous work in this field has been in the visible and near- infrared spectral bands. The mid- to long-wave infrared spectral range has been far less explored, despite the abundant applications in this wavelength range. Here, we will investigate novel photodetectors for this spectral range based on new nanomaterials (primarily by SJTU) and nano-optics (primarily at UoM). We will furthermore develop new imaging and spectroscopy systems by combining these devices with spatial light modulators.

We propose a research program on the development of IR photodetectors based on nano-optics and ultra-thin materials. For the latter, we will investigate what are known as two-dimensional (2D) materials. Such photodetector devices present the opportunity for room temperature operation. Conventional infrared photodetectors generally require cooling. This is because, by definition, infrared radiation comprises photons with small energies. It is thus generally detected by semiconductors with small bandgaps. In such materials, carriers are thermally generated at high rates at room temperature, degrading the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Cooling (e.g. by liquid nitrogen) mitigates this, but adds substantially to size, weight, power consumption and cost.

We propose to develop new types of photodetectors that combine semiconductors with small bandgaps with 2D materials and with nano-optical structures. These will operate using a principle termed “photogating”.  Light will be absorbed by the small bandgap semiconductor material, resulting in the generation of electron-hole pairs. These carriers will in turn modify the conductance of the 2D material. It will thus be possible to detect the infrared radiation by monitoring the resistance of the 2D

material. The fundamental advantage of this configuration is that the 2D material will made from a material (e.g. molybdenum disulphide) that has a much larger bandgap than the narrow bandgap semiconductor material (in which the light is absorbed). The device will therefore have a much lower dark current than the conventional alternative configuration, in which the conductance of the small bandgap material is measured.

As noted above, the proposed devices will also incorporate nano- optical structures. These will serve two purposes. The first purpose is to implement the “optical immersion” principle. Specifically, we will minimise the volume of the photodetector’s active material (to reduce noise) while maintaining its light gathering ability (and thus signal) via the use of the nano-optical structures to collect the light and concentrate it within the active material. The second purpose is to achieve photodetector devices with “tailored” responsivity spectra. We will show that arrays of such detectors (each with a different responsivity spectrum) will enable miniature spectrometer chips (using computational spectral reconstruction) & multispectral imagers.

Next we summarise the plan of work to be undertaken at each institution. The first 12 months of the project will be undertaken at the University of Melbourne. In this phase, the PhD student will use numerical electromagnetics simulations to design the nano-optical structures that collect and concentrate light into the active region of the photodetector. The PhD student will furthermore fabricate these structures at the Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication (MCN) and characterise them optically in the Crozier Group laboratory at the University of Melbourne. The next phase will be performed at Shanghai Jiaotong University and be of 12 months’ duration. During this phase, the PhD student will perform experiments to demonstrate the photogating effect. This will be done by fabricating devices at Shanghai Jiaotong University and testing them. These devices will furthermore incorporate the nano-optical structures developed during the first year.

The last phase will have a duration of 18 months and be performed at the University of Melbourne. During this phase, the PhD student will incorporate the newly demonstrated photodetector into a single pixel camera or into a microspectrometer, and thereby demonstrate an imaging or a spectroscopy application.

In the project plan described above, the work to be undertaken at the University of Melbourne mainly relates to nano-optics and to building an optical system (for imaging or spectroscopy) based on the novel photodetector device. For the work to be undertaken at Shanghai Jiaotong University, the work is mainly to do with semiconductor devices.  This is due to the fact that the main activities of the Crozier Group at the University of Melbourne are in nano-optics and optical systems, while the Yaping Dan group at Shanghai Jiaotong University concentrates on semiconductor devices.

The project will be complemented by the project on Mid-infrared photodetectors based on atomically thin 2D materials and the collaboration will ensure a successful completion of the project.

Supervision team:

Professor Kenneth Crozier (The University of Melbourne)

Associate Professor Yaping Dan (Shanghai Jiao Tong University)

How to apply


Mid-infrared photodetectors based on atomically thin 2D materials

This joint PhD project is based at the Shanghai Jiao Tong University with a 12 month stay at The University of Melbourne.

Project description:
Mid-infrared photodetectors can find a wide range of applications in many fields. The existing mid-infrared photodetectors have to operate at cryo temperature, as a result of which systems for mid-infrared photodetection and imaging are often bulky and expensive. Here, we propose to develop room temperature mid- infrared photodetectors based on atomically thin MoS2 monolayers.

In this study, we propose to develop room temperature mid-infrared photodetectors based on atomically thin MoS2 monolayers. These photodetectors will in turn be used to realize a miniature infrared spectrometer chip. Atomically thin monolayers are poor light absorption materials. To enhance the light absorption, we propose to place the monolayer on a bulk HgCdTe crystalline substrate that absorbs mid-infrared light. The light absorption in HgCdTe substrate with a junction (induced by surface charges or doping) will create a photovoltage gating on the MoS2 monolayer. We will read this out electrically, i.e. by measuring the change in conductivity of the MoS2 monolayer. Since the MoS2 monolayer has a wide bandgap, it can operate in the subthreshold region, meaning that the dark current will be suppressed. The fact that the MoS2 monolayer is atomically thin will allow the weak photovoltage to gate the monolayer in an effective manner and induce a large conductivity change.

We anticipate that this will result in this device having a very high gain (>10^8) and a high photoresponsivity.  One might expect that this approach would lead to the device having high dark current and slow response times. The   dark current can be suppressed by operating the MoS2 monolayer in the subthreshold region. The speed can be improved to ~ 1kHz by lowering the gain a little, e.g. to 10^6. We believe that the planned bandwidth (of 1 kHz) would be adequate for most real applications of these devices (e.g.  imaging). By collaborating with Prof. Kenneth B. Crozier at the University of Melbourne, we aim to develop miniaturized mid-infrared spectral analyzers by integrating spectral filtering structures onto our photodetectors.

In the first year, the PhD student will take required courses and perform optoelectronic simulations on the mid-  infrared photodetectors at Shanghai Jiao Tong University. In the second year of the project will be conducted at the University of Melbourne. The PhD student will use numerical electromagnetics simulations to design the nanostructures that spectrally filter and concentrate light into the active region of the photodetector. The designed structures will be further fabricated at the Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication (MCN) and characterized optically in the Crozier Group Laboratory at the University of Melbourne.  In the third year, the PhD student will return to Shanghai Jiao Tong University and fabricate and electrically characterize the MoS2 monolayer photodetectors. In the fourth year, the PhD student will incorporate the newly fabricated photodetectors into a micro-spectrometer.

The project will be complemented by the project Novel photodetectors based on nanomaterials: devices and applications and the collaboration will ensure a successful completion of the project.

Supervision team:

Associate Professor Yaping Dan (Shanghai Jiao Tong University)

Professor Kenneth Crozier (The University of Melbourne)

 


Language Requirements for SJTU International Graduate Programs

For programs taught in English

All international applicants for admission to any SJTU program must provide evidence that their English language proficiency meets the minimum requirements for admission.

Being born in a native English-speaking country is not a proof of your English proficiency. You will be deemed to have satisfied the English language requirements if you can provide evidence that you meet one or more of the following criteria:

  1. English Language Tests
  2. Prior study in the medium of English

 

English Language Tests

SJTU recognizes a number of English Language tests and English Preparation Courses which can be undertaken to meet the University’s English language requirements. These are set out in the following table, together with the minimum results required.

The test/score must be valid till the year of application. For example, the TOEFL must have been undertaken no more than two years prior to the commencement of the program at SJTU, i.e., the test must be dated on or after 1 January (two years prior) for Fall Semester intake.

English Language Tests Minimum Requirement Remarks
GRE General 320 (total)
160 (Verbal)
160 (Quantitative)
3.5 (Analytical)
Within 5 years after test date
GMAT 550 (overall)
25 (Verbal)
35 (Quantitative)
4.0 (Analytical)
Within 5 years after test date
IELTS (academic) 6.0 (overall)
5.5 (subtests)
Within 2 years after test date

                                                                                                                       

English Language Tests Minimum Requirement Remarks
TOEFL 85 (overall)
22 (writing)
20 (reading)
20 (listening)
20 (speaking)
Within 2 years after test date
Cambridge Certificate in Advanced English (CAE) 176 (overall)
169 (subtest)
Within 2 years after test date
Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) 180 (overall)
180 (subtest)
Within 2 years after test date
NTS GAT General (Pakistan) 70% score For Pakistani applicants to master programs; within 2 years after test date
NTS GAT Subject (Pakistan) 70% score For Pakistani applicants to doctoral programs; within 2 years after test date

Prior study in the medium of English

If you have successfully completed an assessable Senior Secondary qualification or a post-secondary/tertiary study at an accredited university from an English-speaking country1 you do not have to prove proficiency in English provided the qualification was:

  1. Taught and examined in English
  2. Completed no more than two years prior to the commencement of the program at SJTU.
  • The statement or certificate must be on official headed paper, and must be the original document.

* English-speaking countries recognized by SJTU international graduate programs include: American Samoa, Australia, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Botswana, Canada, Fiji, Gibraltar, Ghana, Guyana, Ireland, Jamaica, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, New Zealand, Nigeria, Papua New Guinea, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, The Gambia, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, United Kingdom (including Northern Ireland), United States of America, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

 

For programs taught in Chinese

All international applicants for admission to any SJTU program taught in Chinese must provide evidence that their Chinese language proficiency meets the minimum requirements for admission.

Besides, for most graduate programs in sciences and engineering, similar English requirement as English taught programs applies.

Being born in a Chinese-speaking country is not a proof of your Chinese proficiency. You will be deemed to have satisfied the Chinese language requirements if you can provide evidence that you meet one or more of the following criteria:

  1. Chinese Proficiency Tests (HSK)
  2. Prior study in the medium of Chinese
  3. Chinese Proficiency Tests
Chinese Language Tests Minimum Requirement Remarks
HSK Band 5 200 (total)
60 (subtests)
Within 5 years after test date
HSK Band 6 180 (total)
60 (subtests)
Within 5 years after test date

Prior study in the medium of Chinese

Senior Secondary Studies

If you have successfully completed an assessable Senior Secondary qualification from China (including Taiwan province, Hong Kong SAR, Macau SAR), or Chinese schools in Malaysia, Indonesia, Singapore, you do not have to prove proficiency in Chinese provided the qualification was:

  1. taught and examined in Chinese;
  2. completed no more than five years prior to the commencement of the program at SJTU.

 

Post Secondary or Tertiary Studies

If you have successfully completed full-time study in an assessable qualification at an accredited university where the major language of instruction and assessment was Chinese, you may not be required to undertake a language test if you can provide a statement or certificate issued by the Registrar (or equivalent) confirming:

  1. At least one year of full-time study;
  2. The study must have been completed no more than two years prior to the commencement of the program at SJTU.
  • The statement or certificate must be on official headed paper, and must be the original document.

Fall 2021 SJTU International Graduate Admission

Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU) is a world-renowned higher education institution and one of the top universities in China. It has established itself as a comprehensive, research-oriented, and internationalized university and ranks 47th worldwide (QS 2021). The university now has 31 schools, 31 research institutions and 13 affiliated hospitals, offering a wide range of degree programs.

Each year SJTU admits students from nearly 100 countries, and more than 7000 international students are studying on campus. Its 31 colleges and schools offer more than 100 graduate programs to international students. The study duration for master’s programs is usually 2-3 years (full-time), and 4 years (full-time) for doctoral programs.

Eligibility

The following are general requirements for application to SJTU International Graduate Programs.

  • Non-Chinese citizen.
  • Good health both physically and mentally.
  • Outstanding academic performance and potential.
  • Bachelor’s degree for master program applicants. Master’s degree for doctoral program applicants.
  • Proficiency in Chinese and/or English. For details please refer to Language Requirement for SJTU International Graduate Programs. Applicants for master programs of Chinese Language and Literature, Chinese History, and Philosophy offered by the School of Humanities are required to provide a certificate of HSK Band 6, 180 points and above (with each subtest no less than 60 points). Applicants for Master of Teaching Chinese to Speakers of Other Languages (MTCSOL) offered by the School of Humanities are required to provide a certificate of HSK Band 6, 180 points and above (with each subtest no less than 60 points) and a certificate of HSKK Advanced, 60 points and above. To apply for the French program of SJTU-ParisTech Elite Institute of Technology, you must have a good level in French (≥B2) and English, and for specific application requirements please contact the institute in advance.

 Important Dates

1 October, 2021 – 2022 application opens

15 December, 2021 – Deadline for 1st Round scholarship application

31 March, 2022 – Deadline for 2nd Round scholarship application

31 May, 2022 – Deadline for self-supported application

5 September, 2022 – Enrollment

 

How to Apply

Step 1: Complete the Online Application

Complete and submit an online application at Study@SJTU (http://isc.sjtu.edu.cn/) before the application deadline. If you wish to apply for the scholarship at the same time, please complete the application befor the scholarship deadline.

Step 2: Pay the Application Fee

The application fee is RMB 800 (approx. USD 120), non-refundable and non-transferable. Payment must be made in RMB or USD. You can choose online payment or bank transfer in the online application system. The application fee is waived for UOM candidates – please indicate you are a joint UOM candidate in the system when applying.

 

Materials to Prepare

  • Degree certificates, in scanned files. Applicants who have not graduated by the time of application are required to provide an official letter from their current university stating the expected graduation date.
  • Transcripts, in scanned files. Master’s program applicants are required to submit undergraduate transcripts. Doctoral program applicants are required to submit both undergraduate and graduate transcripts.
  • Proof of Language proficiency (refer to Language Requirement for SJTU International Graduate Programs
  • Scanned copy of passport.
  • Passport-size photo.
  • Personal statement and study plan.
  • Two letters of academic recommendation from scholars who are associate professors or above, or senior professionals in a related academic field. Please follow the instructions on the online system for submission of online recommendation letters or upload the recommendation letters with original signatures.
  • If you are applying for programs of the School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, you are required to contact the supervisor beforehand and provide an acceptance letter by the supervisor. Introduction of School.pdf
  • Note: If your documents are not in English or Chinese, please have them translated into either English or Chinese by an authorized translation agency. Then upload both the translated and original documents onto the application system.

 

Tuition and Housing

  • Tuition:
    • RMB 45,500/Year for Doctoral programs (Approx. USD 6,600/Year)
    • Tuition of Master programs varies with the program, so please check SJTU 2021 international graduate program list for details.
  • On-campus housing: RMB 50-160/Day (Approx. USD 8-25/Day)
    • On-campus housing has limited capacity and is not guaranteed
    • Study@SJTU
      All the policies, regulations and fees of on-campus lodging are listed on the website, and there are limited resources, candidates will have to log into the system before the  opening of the new semester as that is when the university makes announcements regarding room bookings  For SJTU home based candidates, the university will forward this information when the candidate is admitted.  UOM home based candidates, who wish to come to the university other than the usual semester opening dates, should contact the relevant office of the university to request room bookings.  Contact information is also on the website.

Scholarships

For incoming international graduate students, there are two channels for scholarship application: through Shanghai Jiao Tong University or through Chinese Embassies/Consulates in the home country. Applicants may choose only one application channel. Replicated applications through more than one channels is not allowed.

How to Apply

  • Apply for scholarships through SJTU
    • Starting from 2021, scholarships for doctoral programs will consist of: SJTU Fellowship, CSC/SGS Scholarship, SJTU Scholarship. And scholarships for Master programs will consist of: CSC/SGS Scholarship, SJTU Scholarship, School/College Scholarship. Details of each scholarship will be on the application system.
    • When applying at http://apply.sjtu.edu.cn/ applicants should choose “apply for scholarship through SJTU” and follow the steps online. Applicants should complete the scholarship application procedures in time according to the requirements of the university.
    • The earlier an applicant completes the application, the sooner he/she receives an offer of admission and scholarships if the review result from the university is positive. Applicants can check the scholarships result through the application system. The formal offer of scholarships will be sent along with the formal admission letter.
  • Apply for scholarships through Chinese Embassies/Consulates in the home country
    • Applicants may also apply to the Chinese Embassies/Consulates in the home country for scholarship opportunities. The application schedule varies from country to country (usually from November to April).
    • Please consult the Chinese Embassy/Consulate about its application schedule, eligibility, requirements, procedures, documents, agency number, program category type and so on in advance.
    • For the contact information of Chinese Embassies/Consulates, please visit the website of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the People’s Republic of China at http://www.fmprc.gov.cn/mfa_eng/.

Important Notes:

  • In general, scholarship duration cannot be extended.
  • All scholarship recipients are obliged to participate in the annual scholarship review in April and/or May which will confirm their scholarship status in the next academic year.

Contacts

Email: gs.admission@sjtu.edu.cn

Tel: +86-21-34208238

Application Website: http://apply.sjtu.edu.cn/

Address:

International Affairs Office, Graduate School

Shanghai Jiao Tong University

Room 331, Chen Ruiqiu Building

800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240, China

 

Notes:

  1. 1. The GRE Designated Institution Code of SJTU is 2129.
  2. 2. The TOEFL Designated Institution Code of SJTU is B902.

University opens joint PhD program with SJTU

The University of Melbourne has signed an agreement with Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU) to launch its first International Research Training Group (IRTG) with a Chinese university.

Applications for the University of Melbourne-SJTU Joint PhD Projects with paired Seed Funding program are now open. Up to five supervisor “pairs” – a pair being one academic from SJTU and one from the University of Melbourne –will each receive financial support for their research collaboration and for two joint PhD candidates in 2021.

These candidates will spend at least 12 months in each institution and be eligible to graduate with a jointly awarded degree recognised by two testamurs, one from each university.

University of Melbourne Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) Jim McCluskey said the new IRTG supports the University’s desire to explore new ways to work with universities in China.

“Notwithstanding the challenges of the current pandemic, the University of Melbourne is committed to strengthening its research ties in China and collaborating on projects that deliver benefits for both universities,” Professor McCluskey said.

“This new joint PhD program will provide opportunities to address many shared challenges to our environment resulting from climate change; the governance of our institutions, our health and wellbeing, and the many engineering and natural sciences questions that we share,” Professor McCluskey said.

Professor Lisa X. XU,the Vice-President of SJTU for Graduate Education and International Affairs said:

“It is the first time that SJTU combines the funding of joint research with a partner university directly with co-supervision of PhD students. We hope this new initiative will provide more opportunities for students from both sides to enhance their training with global vision”.

University of Melbourne Pro Vice-Chancellor Graduate and International Research Professor Justin Zobel said the IRTG will benefit researchers and graduate researchers from both institutions.

“When candidates spend at least 12 months at each University they will gain invaluable experience and skills from their hosts, whether it is the University of Melbourne or SJTU,” Professor Zobel said.

“The program will help grow the network of Melbourne and SJTU researchers with experience and understanding of both the Australian and Chinese research landscapes.”

Applications for the University of Melbourne-SJTU Joint PhD Projects with paired Seed Funding program are open until 17 August. Applications can be made here:


Decarbonizing future transport with ammonia fueled engines

This joint PhD project will be based at The University of Melbourne with a minimum 12 month stay at the Shanghai Jiao Tong University.

Project description

Transport is one of the most difficult energy sectors for decarbonization. Despite the increasing popularity of electric vehicles, future transport for aviation, shipping and long-haul trucking will continue to rely on combustion engines. Decarbonization of these sectors is particularly challenging, where the target of zero-carbon emissions is likely only to be met via switching to carbon-neutral fuels, such as green ammonia derived from renewable energy. In this context, green hydrogen is first produced by electrolysis of water using renewable energy and then react with nitrogen to produce green ammonia for various end uses including in combustion engines.

Ammonia has very different combustion chemistry which causes various problems in practical application. This jointed PhD project will investigate the fundamental chemistry behind these problems and provide scientific guidance to solve them. In particular, it will utilize hydrogen as a co-burning fuel to modify ammonia combustion chemistry and solve the problems from the ground up. The kinetic interactions between hydrogen and ammonia will be studied experimentally at conditions representative of practical application and from which a high-fidelity reaction chemistry model will be developed. This project will combine the research expertise at UoM and SJTU and utilize the complementary, world-leading facilities at the two universities. Outcome of these projects will guide the design of ammonia engines for zero-emission transport.

The project will be complemented by the project on Combustion chemical kinetics of ammonia-diesel binary fuels and the collaboration will ensure a successful completion of the project.

Supervision team:

Associate Professor Yi Yang, Professor Michael Brear (The University of Melbourne)

Professor Xingcai Lu, Associate Professor Dong Han (Shanghai Jiao Tong University)

How to apply

If you are interested in this opportunity, read the application guidelines before contacting the lead supervisor.


Number of posts found: 25